N is for Notice

N is for Notice, 2015 A to Z Challenge -- April J. Moore
As you notice here, I am doing my best to get noticed, but the camera is pointed at my sister. Someone noticed, however, and took my picture, but did I notice? I doubt it. I was to busy trying to get noticed elsewhere.

How often do we do this as writers? When you stare at your Facebook page, or list of Twitter followers, do you ever feel like you’re jumping up and down, waving your arms and saying, “Look at my book! Look at my book!”? It always feels like everyone’s looking the other direction. 

Chances are, the more you parade around with your book, the least likely people will take notice. Just this week, I’ve come across a few authors who have some stern advice on author self-promotion. Delilah S. Dawson, tells us why we need to just shut up; and Jody Hedlund gives us her 5 reasons for unfriending authors on Facebook. And as always. Chuck Wendig offers his sage advice on the subject.

Bottom line, it sounds like we’re going about this all the wrong way. Dawson points out, social media does not sell books (which I’m tending to agree with), so maybe it’s time to stop trying to get noticed by those means, and start looking at the other avenues that are actually there to help get your work some attention.

Goodreads. It’s where the readers are. GR offers affordable advertising for authors, as well as opportunities to discuss your book and answer questions from readers. 
Talk to local libraries. If you have a group of fellow authors willing to spend an afternoon doing readings, approach libraries with the idea. They want to draw readers, too, so it could be a win-win. They usually have author programs and events, so it doesn’t hurt to reach out to them.
Bookstores. Yes, this is usually a no-brainer, but these days—at least where I live—a lot of the bookstores are charging authors $50-$200 to have a solo signing. Usually, promotion (print and online) is included in that, but if you ask me, that’s still a lot of money. With that said, they’re still worth looking into; you never know. Plus, if you rope in a few other authors, you could make it worth the smaller fee. 
Gift shops, coffee shops, etc. What if your main character runs a cafe? See about having a signing at your favorite local coffeehouse. If you mention a certain store or city in your book, you might have luck contacting that store, or bookstores in that city willing to host a signing. Local commerce usually loves it when their fine city is mentioned in a book.
Radio shows and podcasts. I talked about this yesterday, so I won’t get into here, but it’s certainly an often-overlooked venue for writers. 
Contact websites, eZines, and magazines that fit into your book’s genre/subject matter to review the book. Have a PDF version of your book ready to go so that you can shoot it off to someone who is interested. They may be willing to trade; they’ll review it if you write an article for them. Also be willing to send off hard copy freebies to some well-known reviewers. And think big, because you never know. If you’ve written an amazing book, why wouldn’t Leonardo DeCaprio want to make it into a movie?
Offer your services. Present at conferences, or teach a workshop with the local writing organization. These are great ways to showcase your talents and pass your words of wisdom onto others. Offer readers the the chance to read the first chapter or two of your book; or if you’ve written a short story, offer it for free for a limited time. Cross promote by offering a guest post to a fellow author. Like I mentioned in a previous post, it’s not about you; it’s about readers and what you can impart on their lives.

So if you feel as though you’re not getting noticed with the usual outlets, maybe it’s time to look in other directions.

What have you found to be the best way to get noticed as a writer?

A to Z Challenge 2015

4 thoughts on “N is for Notice

  1. Patricia Stoltey

    I recommend looking around for contests/competitions for your genre. Some are only for traditionally published and others include certain self-published categories. Some are for print only and others for ebooks. There’s usually a fee and you’ll need to send copies for print books, but even becoming a finalist may sell books. And winning, especially a prestigious competition definitely sells books.

    Reply
    1. April J. Moore

      That’s right, Ms. Colorado Book Award Finalist! I left out a big one–contests! And you’re absolutely right; these are great ways of getting noticed. Readers take notice when a book wins awards and publishers take notice when someone’s manuscript takes home a prize. Thanks for pointing this one out, Pat.

      Reply
  2. Dean K Miller

    Finding the golden ticket of recognition is the branch we reach for. I agree with you and your list of writers/articles: it seems there are so many of us waving our arms in the sea of “recognize me” that instead of looking like we need to be rescued, we look more like a synchronized swimming team and people are seeing “us” and saying, “My, that’s nice.” and moving on.

    For me, I’m looking at other, less populated, options. Something that (hopefully) produces a more personal touch/reach. I think I’d rather hang on to one or two stable readers and stay afloat than sink with the masses.

    Reply
    1. April J. Moore

      Love your answer, Dean. And it’s very true; we just blend in with everyone else and it can be really tough to stand out in a crowd–unless you mess up somehow–then people suddenly notice!

      Reply

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